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Anaesthesia and breastfeeding

I have been working with a small team of anaesthetists for some time to develop guidelines so that breastfeeding mothers can have surgery, pain relief etc and continue to breastfeed as normal. The guideline also recommends support for the mother in terms of pumps, information and her baby nearby – not necessarily in that order.

As we begin World Breastfeeding Week 2020 I am proud to share this guideline and infographic

Guideline on anaesthesia and sedation in breastfeeding women 2020

Infographic guideline on anaesthesia and sedation in breastfeeding women

Books to buy

Do you want to buy a copy of one of my books? They are all available on Amazon which is probably easiest. Or direct from the publishers Routledge, Pinter and Martin, or Praeclarus Press. I’m not going to available as much in the future to answer questions so maybe now is the time to buy the books so you have answers 24/7 365 days a year.

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Lack of stools / constipation in a breastfed baby

Constipation in the neonate is a topic apparently rarely discussed in medical sources and may be seen as the domain of the health visitor or midwife. However, many “constipated” babies may be seen by their GP and be the cause of concern for their parents.

This factsheet is designed to provide information for parents and their professionals on what is normal with regard to baby poo and where interventions are required be that referral to breastfeeding expert or medical treatment.

lack of stool/constipation in breastfed babies

Pharmacokinetics and Passage of Drugs into Breastmilk

This is a set of slides I use in many of my current presentations. It also forms the backbone of most decision making. I hope it helps increase your education. If you wish please email me wendy@breastfeeding-and-medication.co.uk

Pharmacokinetics of the passage of drugs into breastmilk training powerpoint

If you found this useful, maybe you need to buy the book – a good investment !

Candida (thrush) on the breast of breastfeeding mother training powerpoint

This is the presentation I have given most frequently since I co-authored the first thrush leaflet back in around 1999. I hope this helps some of the mis information eg it can be on one breast, thrush means painful feeds, all white tongues in babies are thrush

If you have any questions pleas email wendy@breastfeeding-and-medication.co.uk

Thrush and breastfeeding training powerpoint

Mastitis and Breastfeeding

This is one of the presentations I have given most frequently over the last 20 years since I co wrote the first leaflet for BfN. One of the most common complications of breastfeeding but so little understood. I hope this helps the onging learning of professionals, peer supporters and all those supporting breastfeeding.

Breastfeeding and Mastitis Training

Raynaud’s Phenomenon and Breastfeeding Training

I am uploading most of the presentations that I have given over the years as training material for others to use as continued professional development.

If you have any queries pleas email wendy@breastfeeding-and-medication.co.uk. Please consider buying my book if you find this useful

Raynauds and Breastfeeding training

Hypertension (raised blood pressure) and Breastfeeding

Many mothers experience raised blood pressure it seems. Is this due to our busy lifestyles, more mums giving birth at an older age? Who knows but it causes a lot of confusion. The drug normally initiated if a mother has symptoms of pre-eclampsia is labetolol. It is usually continued after delivery until the BP has settled. Virtually none passes into breastmilk. However, some mothers with poor circulation may notice sore, white nipples where the supply to the tip is decreased . If this happens the drug may need to be changed. Prolonged high BP in pregnancy can lead to restricted growth of the baby who may be born sleepy. Rather than just monitoring blood glucose levels the baby should be helped to attach to the breast and feed regularly or be given colostrum by spoon or syringe. A drop of colostrum can work magic.

Later blood pressure rises can be treated with enalapril, amlodipine and felodipine which are all compatible with breastfeeding according to expert sources. The NICE Guidelines NG 133 (2019) can also guide good practice.

The data for this fact sheet is taken from my book Breastfeeding and Medication which provides more detail and references to studies. Please consider buying a copy for future reference.

Hypertension and breastfeeding factsheet

Prescribing for breastfeeding mothers

I have decided to stop travelling around as much to deliver presentations at conferences. Just feeling a little too jaded and yes I will admit old. But have decided instead to share the contents via this website in the hope that it can spread good practice further and more easily. Happy to answer any questions if you email wendy@breastfeeding-and-medication.co.uk

prescribing for breastfeeding mothers ppt

If you find it useful maybe you would like to buy my book – on Amazon shorturl.at/kpuyI