Home » fact sheet

Category Archives: fact sheet

Breastfeeding after CT and MRI scans

Virtually every day I get messages from mothers and health visitors querying whether mothers can continue to breastfeed after CT and MRI scans. I was told that the national guidelines had been updated some years ago to align with RANZR guidelines . Sadly this doesnt seem to have been adopted by all radiology departments from my experience.

I was lucky enough to work with Dr Gabrielle Cronin on this paper which was published recently in the Irish BMK https://rb.gy/opvtzx

Most mothers are advised to stop breastfeeding for 24 hours but there is no evidence for this as most contrast media are not orally bio available and have half lives which do not justify this duration.

More information

https://www.breastfeedingnetwork.org.uk/ct/ https://www.breastfeedingnetwork.org.uk/mri/

RANZR guidelines

ADHD and Breastfeeding

I have shared the chapter on ADHD from my book Breastfeeding and Chronic Medical Conditions multiple times this week. Many mothers seem to be diagnosed in later life and are concerned about breastfeeding. Hope this is a useful link.

More information Breastfeeding and ADHD factsheet

If this is useful maybe you need the book available on Amazon. I published on Kindle to try to make this more affordable and available to mothers and breastfeeding supporters as well as professionals

Fibromyalgia and Breastfeeding

Fibromyalgia is incredibly difficult to deal with when you have a baby. The most effective intervention is CBT. Please read this factsheet which is a chapter from my book Breastfeeding and chronic medical conditions available on amazon.

Breastfeeding and Fibromyalgis factsheet

Mirtazapine and Breastfeeding

With the developing COVID situation more mothers are struggling to sleep and being prescribed mirtazapine for anxiety and depression associated with poor sleep. This is the information I used in Breastfeeding and Medication.

For more information Mirtazapine and Breastfeeding Factsheet

or maybe buy the book

ADHD and Breastfeeding

Currently there seem to be many questions about treatment of ADHD and breastfeeding. I’m sharing the chapter from my book Breastfeeding and Chronic Medical Conditions which I hope helps

For more information :

Breastfeeding and ADHD factsheet

and maybe you would like to but the book available on Amazon

Depression and breastfeeding

The rise in the statistics on COVID seems to be exacerbating symptoms of depression for many, many people. I can totally identify with that because I am immunocompromised myself due to medication and have very much gone back into Shield mode.

Many of the queries I have had in the last week relate to mothers who need to begin, increase or change their antidepressant medication but are being advised to stop breastfeeding to do so. There is evidence that stopping breastfeeding in itself lowers mood – you have a baby who wants to be breastfed and is fighting the change, you loose oxytocin, you become engorged – it isnt as easy as “stop now” might sound.

This is the chapter on depression from my new book Breastfeeding and chronic medical conditions. I hope the chapter helps in itself but maybe you would like to buy it and learn more about how drugs get into milk.

I will of course answer any queries you have wendy@breastfeeding-and-medication.co.uk

More information: depression and breastfeeding factsheet

Bi polar disorder and breastfeeding

This is one section of the new book that I am currently working on and should hopefully be available in kindle format shortly

bipolar disorder and breastfeeding fact sheet

Colonoscopy and Endoscopy in breastfeeding women

I am so very tired of breastfeeding mothers who need colonoscopies and endoscopies being told that they need to interrupt breastfeeding. I am currently trying to engage with the national body to update national guidelines. Interestingly it is the same old story – we dont see breastfeeding women needing these examinations. So how come I do?

This is the evidence that I have put together and am desperate to share with clinicians.

colonoscopy and endoscopy in lactating women factsheet

Anaesthesia and breastfeeding

I have been working with a small team of anaesthetists for some time to develop guidelines so that breastfeeding mothers can have surgery, pain relief etc and continue to breastfeed as normal. The guideline also recommends support for the mother in terms of pumps, information and her baby nearby – not necessarily in that order.

As we begin World Breastfeeding Week 2020 I am proud to share this guideline and infographic

Guideline on anaesthesia and sedation in breastfeeding women 2020

Infographic guideline on anaesthesia and sedation in breastfeeding women

Glucosamine and chondroitin supplements during breastfeeding

Again I wonder if this is a consequence of the Lockdown but more breastfeeding mums seem to have taken up running again or for the first time. We have all needed to take exercise in this strange world the past few months.

This is the information on glucosamine and chondroitin during breastfeeding – enjoy your running. Yes it is safe in breastfeeding : https://kellymom.com/bf/can-i-breastfeed/lifestyle/mom-exercise/

Glucosamine

Glucosamine is either derived from shellfish or synthetically produced. The shellfish derived product should be avoided by anyone with a shellfish allergy.

It is most commonly used to treat osteoarthritis and joint pain or to prevent joint damage. A glucosamine derivative, N-acetylglucosamine, is a normal component of human breastmilk. Glucosamine occasionally causes stomach discomfort in adults  but is generally well tolerated. There are no studies on levels in breastmilk but it is poorly absorbed and metabolised in the liver so levels absorbed by the breastfed baby are likely to be very low.

Chondroitin

Chondroitin is a  mixture of large glycosaminoglycans and disaccharide polymers, usually derived from shark or bovine cartilage. It is most commonly used to treat osteoarthritis because it acts as a flexible connecting material between the protein filaments in cartilage.

Chondroitin is poorly absorbed orally with a bioavailability of about 10%. Its molecular weight averages 50,000 Daltons so is unlikely to be absorbed by breastfed babies at all.

 It is well tolerated in mothers with occasional gastrointestinal upset reported. Although no studies exist on the use of chondroitin sulphate supplements during breastfeeding, small amounts occur naturally in breastmilk. Mothers of preterm infants excrete greater amounts of chondroitin into breastmilk than mothers of fullterm infants.The use of chondroitin by a nursing mother is unlikely to adversely affect the breastfed infant.

References

Coppa GV, Gabrielli O, Zampini L et al. Glycosaminoglycan content in term and preterm milk during the first month of lactation. Neonatology. 2011;101:74-76. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21934331/

Hale TW Medications and Mothers Milk

LactMed https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK501922/